Home Design Find - Interior Design, Architecture, Modern Furniture - Part 2
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Home Design Find

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Nice Graphic Design in Black and White Swedish Cottage for an Artist

Villa Barone, WRB 06/2008

The biggest part of this black and white cottage at the resort location at Ingarö-Evlinge, in Sweden, is dug into the slope at the far border of the property, creating a large horizontal platform at ground level to its side.

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The Casa Barone was designed by Widjedal Racki Bergerhoff for a young Italian painter and his Swedish wife with a studio space that enabled the homeowner to work inspired by the lovely surroundings.

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One of the more intriguing aspects is that the bath (to the left) overlooks the living room.

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As can be seen in the plan, this means the view out over the water can be shared by the bather.

Barone House WRB Arkitektstudio, Widjedal Rackie Bergerhoff 02-2008, Ingarö

This sofa occupies the corner of the living room overseen by the bather behind the wall.

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A skylight above the bath similarly connects the bather with the sky above.

Barone House WRB Arkitektstudio, Widjedal Rackie Bergerhoff 02-2008, Ingarö

The glossy black wooden floors with the contrasting softness and shelter of the soft and white cushioned sofas are a delight.

Villa Barone, WRB 06/2008

While the waterside cottage houses just the painter and his wife, there is ample entertaining space for dinner guests.

Barone House WRB Arkitektstudio, Widjedal Rackie Bergerhoff 02-2008, Ingarö

These glossy black wooden floors throughout the ultra-modern Casa Barone anchor the home into the view.

Villa Barone, WRB 06/2008

Upstairs too, warmed by a fire, the bedroom shares the same glossy black painted floor as downstairs.

Villa Barone, WRB 06/2008

The view as you descend from the bedroom via the central stair, creating a a super-narrow tall void that beautifully slices the white space.

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There had been an existing home on the property, but it sat in the middle of the property leaving only unusable narrow and highly sloping ground around it.

Villa Barone, WRB 06/2008

By digging in next to the site of the existing flat foundation of the old house, a new exterior flat space was created.

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Industrial Chic Makeover of a 1960s Icon

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Casual industrial chic is amusing and never cold in this black interior makeover of a landmark work.

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Chadbourne + Doss Architects have reconstructed one of Seattle architect Fred Bassetti’s earliest designs from 1962.

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Now a new metal skin with interior cedar liner wraps over the roof and grounds the house to the site.

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Glass forms both sides of this delicious reading room with a warm fire at one end.

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Black surrounds nearly all surfaces of this stark white kitchen.

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Viewed from the opposite side, a warm wood encases and is supported by black steel beams.

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This cedar wood lined “box” shape is new, wrapping and encasing the home.
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Rough and rustic boulders are feature that bring the wooded site in to a patio under the family home.
Mercer Island House
By extreme contrast, bathing spaces are ethereally bright, smooth and seamless.
Mercer Island House
Yet all the materials used throughout are natural but installed and crafted in an extremely crisp manner.
Mercer Island House
Entering the glowing white center of the home has got to be a sensuous delight after the matte black of the bedroom.
Altogether a sensitive makeover of an icon.

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Contemporay Intrigue in Mercer Island Courtyard House

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An eerie cool light comes in from the courtyard dug out of the hillside around this house on Mercer Island in Washington.

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An inverted version features at the center of the house; a ‘courtyard” that contains and conceals the stairs.

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Within, a beautiful fireplace clad in black contrasts with the warmth of the flame.

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Black steel, concrete and glass also form the courtyard that is the central concept of this beautiful contemporary holiday home by Hutchison and Maul.

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Like many holiday houses, the contemporary beauty overlooks a watery view.

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The Courtyard House is clad in corrosion-resistant metal, not only the roof, but the walls.

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It can be entered by a bridge that crosses above the courtyard that is dug out of the hillside.

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Stairs take you down into the center of the house between walls forming this dizzying external passageway.

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Local rocky remnants of the steep hillside are given a reverent placement at the entrance.
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The Washington climate is frequently foggy and rainy so the house is designed to give both views and protection from cold.
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Floor to ceiling glazing with energy conserving double pane glass combines with the warmth of a fire.

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The internal courtyard can be viewed from two sides.

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From the courtyard itself, the watery view can be seen through the house.

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The enormous concrete base indicates the steepness of the narrow site, and why the tall concrete courtyard made sense.

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While downstairs all is rich dark woods and black steel; upstairs forms a contrast.

Serenely facing out across the water, colors give way to peaceful all-white interiors.

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50 Years Later – a Home for an Artist

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Gary Gladwish Architecture designed this sustainable home for an artist in Orcas Island, Washington.

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54 years ago she visited the island and decided that one day she would live there.

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All her life, the artist had been working with rocks, nature and landscape.

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Populated with madrone trees, firs, beech, thistle, moss and rocks with magnificent views to the west, the site of her future dream home had remained un-built over 40 years.

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The architects selected a material palette to incorporate some of her favorite materials like rusty steel siding and moss and rocks from the building site.

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The entry walk utilizes a favorite rustic wood recycled from a 100 year old barn.

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The house is entered at the pivot point of its L-Shape.

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An art studio and storage area provides the flexibility to add bedrooms or an apartment in the future.

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The simple L-Shape plan centers around an open plan living/dining cooking area with a study and bedroom on one wing.

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The house is designed for ease of movement for the artist to age in place – without stairs and encumbrances.

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This design will accommodate the inevitable bad hips, knees and back worn out from a lifetime of moving rocks, dirt and plants.

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Double insulated windows and doors surpass energy code requirements and all of the lighting is either LED or CFL.
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With its construction in honest natural stone the bathroom is both modest and sensuous.

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Around the long side of the L-Shape, large doors slide away to open the house to the expansive views.

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The achitects have fulfilled a long time dream – a true living room in the woods.

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Design Dilemma: The Modern Farmhouse Sink

transitional kitchen how to tips advice

Have you always admired the look of farmhouse sinks but wondered if they would fit into a modern setting? Certainly there is an allure to the oversized sinks of yesteryear. The sinks are well beyond the size of most modern sinks today. They were built in a time before running water, when it was necessary to bring in well water from outside. The sinks were made extra large, to reduce the amount of running back and forth between sink and well. Not only that, but these large sized sinks are extra deep, and worked perfectly on a farm, where they could also be employed to wash clothes or prepare large quantities of freshly harvested vegetables, or even a plucked chicken or two, for cooking. Unlike undermounted sinks with cabinetry, you stand right up close to the sink, making it easier to accomplish your task.

Today, most of us go for farmhouse sinks not for the practical aspect, but because they look really cool. They hint at tradition and hearth and home. Plus, if you love to cook, they’re great for washing really large pots, baking sheets and other oversized cooking implements. Can these old-fashioned sinks work in a more modern context? We think so! Take a look:

Stainless Steel

transitional kitchen how to tips advice

Who says farmhouse sinks can only come in porcelain? Above, a double farmhouse sink in stainless steel picks up on the industrial vibe which has been so trendy in the last few years. It would fit well into a modern minimal loft. This one’s by Kraus.

Below, another example, with squared off edges:

contemporary kitchen how to tips advice

And another example here, this time with a rounded edge:

contemporary kitchen how to tips advice

And here, a Kohler:

contemporary kitchen how to tips advice

Porcelain

Just because a kitchen is modern in style doesn’t mean a porcelain farmhouse sink can’t be used to mix things up. Below is one great example:

industrial kitchen how to tips advice

Here’s another Kohler porcelain sink called the Whitehaven Hayridge featuring a gentle pattern of horizontal ridges on the apron-front. A large single basin accommodates large pots and pans, while the sloped bottom helps with draining and cleanup.

beach style kitchen how to tips advice

And here:

mediterranean kitchen how to tips advice

Stone

Below, this Hawaii bathroom uses onyx for a modern, distinctive feel.

tropical bathroom how to tips advice

And here’s a sink of soapstone,

farmhouse kitchen how to tips advice

So if you’re a lover of farmhouse sinks and you’re wondering if you can make it work in your modern kitchen, the answer is yes!