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In a Thai House for Three Generations, a Picturesque Minimalism

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A series of picture-perfect framed views marks this sweet house in Thailand by TA-CHA Design.

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Seen either from the front or the side, the dining room presents a perfectly composed image.

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Similarly, the picturesque view of the living room offers well framed shots from any angle.

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For the three generations who will live in the 4,000 sq ft house, the design represents the Thai concept of ‘Chan’ or connection – of people with people.

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And Chan also refers to connecting with nature – the flowing indoor-outdoor space created invites lounging outdoors in the sun.

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Its entire front wall is made up of bi-folded glass doors that open the full length of the room to the outdoors.

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In a new take on traditional Thai architecture, a stack effect pulls hot air up and out of the house by drawing cool air in through the open center of the house, where a tree grows, to the four bedrooms upstairs.

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An open staircase entering the south side of the house cools the house by pulling heat in past the tree and out of the roof at the top.

To one side of this airy center, a daybed offers refuge to curl up with a book, sandwiched between two wings of storage.

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Providing both charm and traditional practicality, the minimalist house is an urbane solution to multifamily living in a busy Thai city.

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Minimalist Spa Seaside Retreat just Two Hours from Bangkok

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Guests entering Thailand’s Hôtel de la Paix resort ascend a grand flight of stairs as wide as a small hill.

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The ultimate in minimalist elegance, the serene spa retreat offers a rooftop view out over Cha-Am Beach near Hua Hin.

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The deliciously tactile, clean-lined contemporary airy spaces blend indoors with outdoors in both dramatic and casual ease.

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Throughout, Thai designer Duangrit Bunnag embraces the breeziest simplicity of design.

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Bedrooms are quietly contemplative, pared-down, refined.

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The plain concrete walls soar high above silky white duvets.

The architects employ a surprising textural palette that varies through the resort.

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Cool spa treatment rooms and baths are clad in limestone and proportioned like Roman baths, encasing the visitor in a total silence.

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In the balmy and humid tropical climate, open pavilion spaces are the rule.

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Limestone floors provide a cool respite from the tropical heat.

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For sea worshippers; a simple boutique-chic pavilion is surrounded by tea light candles.
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Concrete is used for bedroom walls but glossy black tile is employed to clad an exterior wall, richly contrasted with a stark white umbrella and red cusions.
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The result is a stunningly sedative seaside resort that batters the senses with variety and contrast.

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Lovely Glass Extension Lights up a London Mews House

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The simplest glass box appears to slice open the ground floor of a semi-detached Victorian house in the West Venice neighborhood in London.
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Making no attempt to stay in the character of the original, London-based DOSarchitects simply bring a glass box of plain air and light into the ground floor.
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For cramped Londoners, such airy light and space are a real luxury.
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The extension transitions between old and new by just reworking the ground floor, where most of the original features had already been replaced by the previous owners anyway.
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To create a more family-friendly space in the lower ground floor they eliminated some of the internal partitions so the light is drawn deep in to the old ground floor.

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Upstairs, the original antiquity is retained in all its genteel old-world sweetness.
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This is where the architects keep some of the splendid features and character that their client had fallen in love when finding the house.
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The typical old Victorian claw foot tub gets sympatico new fittings.
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New additions in London must solve the problem of how to add to the architecture of former centuries without mixing two ornate styles that clash.

Sometimes the answer is to use the ‘no-style’ of the simplest possible glass box: leaving the ornate original as the only ‘style’ of the building.

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A Beautiful Fishing Cabin by Olson Kundig Architects

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The lovely patina of weathered steel and the magnificent proportions of its huge cantilevered roof marks the two-story fishing cabin by Olson Kundig Architects in the cool northern light of Olympic Peninsula in Washington.

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Like many buildings by Olson Kundig Architects, the Sol Duc Cabin has a rugged quality that celebrates the masculine pleasures of the simple life in a return to nature.

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To survive occasional flooding, the 350 square foot fishing cabin is set lightly on the site, sitting high on four steel columns.

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Huge industrial-scale sliding steel panels mean the two story structure can be completely closed up when the owner is away.

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Inside, the get-away-from-it-all fishing cabin is outfitted in the firm’s typically masculine no-nonsense style of industrial chic.

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Inside the tall two story space, the bedroom is set high on a mezzanine floor.

While the materials used are restricted to the brutally spartan, the luxury of this very elevated open space is untrammelled.

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Design Dilemma: The Modern Retro Kitchen

traditional kitchen how to tips advice

Yes, sleek and modern is nice, but there’s something particularly special about a retro, vintage kitchen. To our mind, the perfect retro kitchen is one that references the traditional and the vintage, without reproducing too rigorously the era from which it is drawn. One of our favorite examples is the kitchen above, which has the feel of an old farmhouse kitchen. Complete with the farmhouse sink, butcher block countertops, utilitarian subway tile, vintage stove and aluminum industrial lights, the kitchen definitely has a timeless, country air. And yet, there’s a feeling of modernity resulting from the modern stainless steel refrigerator, the ethereal gray wall color choice and the white oak floors.

Below, another modern retro kitchen boasts a 50s aesthetic while still feeling very contemporary:

traditional kitchen how to tips advice

Above, it’s the bright red stove, the black and white linoleum and the cabinet pulls that feel a little bit vintage. On the other hand, the stove is actually a very modern one with a slightly retro look. The small appliances have a retro look but are clearly modern. The result is that this kitchen feels a bit 50s without straying into kitsch territory.

What if your personal vibe leans more toward the 60s than the 50s? Below is a kitchen that references the 60s — Eames style chairs, the vivid yellow acrylic light, the bright laminate countertop. But it still feels contemporary, partially because the cabinetry and appliances are contemporary in style.

midcentury kitchen how to tips advice

Below, find another modern retro kitchen. The mint green cabinets and retro-style refrigerator suggest the 50s, along with the bead-board ceilings. And yet the door pulls, the appliances, the lighting, suggests nothing else but modern.

modern kitchen how to tips advice

Here are some more views:

modern kitchen how to tips advice

And this:

modern kitchen how to tips advice

And this:

modern kitchen how to tips advice

So what are the secrets of achieving a retro feel while keeping things fresh and modern?

  • Consider white subway tile. It’s a classic that still boasts a clean feel that will never go out of style.
  • Don’t feel that all your appliances have to be “retro.” You can opt for one retro “statement” piece — perhaps a refrigerator, as in the kitchen above, or perhaps a stove, as in the first kitchen in this post. Going for all retro appliances may pull your kitchen into the “too cute” territory.
  • Consider opting for period colors, without opting for a period style. The pale pastel green of the kitchen above certainly suggests the 50s, but the clean lines of the cabinetry and countertops are utterly contemporary. Melding the two creates a freshness that would not have been possible if the owners had chosen retro everything.
  • Let your lighting do the talking. Sometimes, all it really takes to create a period feel is investing in statement lighting figures. The industrial pendants in the first picture speak to old farmhouses and lighting fixtures of the early 20th century. The acrylic light in the third photo definitely says “mid-century modern.”